BLOG: Halloween Anxiety

by Aaron Weintraub

​As exciting as Halloween can be, it also provokes a lot of anxiety. Here are a few suggestions for helping your child to cope with the scarier side of what can be a fun holiday.

As exciting as Halloween can be, it also provokes a lot of anxiety. Here are a few suggestions for helping your child to cope with the scarier side of what can be a fun holiday.


1. Go over what will be happening. Practice trick or treating. If you child is anxious about the dark, consider trick or treating earlier while it is still light out or attending a well lit alternative. Many towns have "trunk or treat" in a large public parking lot.

2. Focus on other aspects than the costumes such as choosing candy to hand out and pumpkin carving. The other side of Halloween is a fall harvest celebration so focus on the colors and flavors of Autumn.

3. Give your child an outlet to express fear and anxiety with out dismissing it or immediately trying to problem solve with reassurance.

As always remember that children process their fears through play, so expect an increase in scary play. Engage when you can gently guide the play schema to a funny or calming resolution but don't be afraid to just let your child play it out.

Aaron Weintraub
Written by:

Aaron Weintraub

Aaron Weintraub has been working with children and families with special needs for more than ten years. His philosophy of practice is based on respect for individuals and a deep belief that every child can thrive if shown respect, affection, and trust in their innate abilities. Groups focus on building the resilience and confidence that will allow your child to make and keep close and meaningful relationships throughout life. Aaron Weintraub is the author of five peer reviewed publications and three books on Autism including: The Spectrum Manifesto, We Are the 1.01%, and The Big Shrug. Aaron was a Cunningham Fellow at Virginia Tech, and has been awarded the Moran Scholarship, the Margaret Barnes Intergenerational Scholarship, and the Mattie J. T. Stephanik Caregiver Award. His biggest and most important job remains helping to raise his two children.